Please enable javascript to view this site.

Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image
RT @engadget: Meerkat the livestreaming app is no more https://t.co/ktzyos5BIm https://t.co/lzt4sAOti0

John Logan Archives - ShowBizCafe.com

John Logan Archives - ShowBizCafe.com

Adam Garcia

By

2015/11/06 at 9:35am

Spectre (Movie Review)

11.6.2015 | By |

*The following review features some mighty big SPOILERS, so proceed with caution.

The 1-4-0: Despite an electric opening, #Spectre fails to live up to standards of Casino Royale or Skyfall. Read More

Jack Rico

By

2012/02/28 at 12:00am

Hugo

02.28.2012 | By |

I would describe ‘Hugo’, Martin Scorsese’s new cinematographic attempt, as a fairytale for adults, that takes children into account, but it is not exactly directed at them. The pace of the film tends to be less crazy than other films with the same release date (Arthur Christmas, The Muppets), and therefore, less entertaining for younger viewers. However, there’s enough visual and emotional material here to distract them.

The film is based on Brian Seiznick’s bestseller ‘The Invention of Hugo Cabret’ and it focuses on Hugo (Asa Butterfield) an orphan child from the thirties that lives hidden in a station in Paris and is in charge of watches. The kid will find himself involved in a mysterious adventure when he tries to repair a broken robot that his father left unfinished. One day he meets a girl (Chloë Moretz) that seems to have the key to solving the mystery of the robot.  

‘Hugo’ in reality is a love letter to silent film and the importance of preserving movies for posterity. Whoever knows Scorsese’s life, will know that the film was made for his biggest passion in life – cinema. This reminds me of how Quentin Tarantino had a similar message in Inglorious Basterds. The style is not what we have come to expect from the master. First, the work is done in 3D and takes place in Paris. Secondly, the concept of the film is family oriented: he’s never done anything like it. The result is a spectacular experience, it is in itself, a dream come true. 

The characters in the film are colorful and the cast’s acting seems sincere, but the one that stands out is Sir Ben Kingsley known for his masterpiece ‘Ghandi’ from 1982. The youngsters Asa Butterfield (The Boy in the Striped Pajamas) and Chloe Moretz (Kick Ass) do a good job although it is obvious that the boy lacks acting chops. The cast includes Sacha Baron Cohen (Borat) who shows a dramatic side for the first time, Emily Mortimer and Richard Griffiths, Ray Winstone as Hugo’s drunken uncle, Jude Law as Hugo’s father, and Christopher Lee, as a librarian.  

The 3D experience is one of this year’s best. You only have to see the opening scene to understand how wonderfully Scorsese presented it.

‘Hugo’ is one of my favorite movies of the year because it is visually impressive, it uses 3D technology perfectly, the story is original and it connects me with my passion for movies, I like its adventurous plot and the characters are memorable. And of course, it is yet another chance to delight ourselves seeing a Scorsese film, one of the greatest directors in the history of cinema. What a luxury!

Jack Rico

By

2011/11/27 at 12:00am

Hugo

11.27.2011 | By |

Hugo

I would describe ‘Hugo’, Martin Scorsese’s new cinematographic attempt, as a fairytale for adults, that takes children into account, but it is not exactly directed at them. The pace of the film tends to be less crazy than other films with the same release date (Arthur Christmas, The Muppets), and therefore, less entertaining for younger viewers. However, there’s enough visual and emotional material here to distract them.

The film is based on Brian Seiznick’s bestseller ‘The Invention of Hugo Cabret’ and it focuses on Hugo (Asa Butterfield) an orphan child from the thirties that lives hidden in a station in Paris and is in charge of watches. The kid will find himself involved in a mysterious adventure when he tries to repair a broken robot that his father left unfinished. One day he meets a girl (Chloë Moretz) that seems to have the key to solving the mystery of the robot.  

‘Hugo’ in reality is a love letter to silent film and the importance of preserving movies for posterity. Whoever knows Scorsese’s life, will know that the film was made for his biggest passion in life – cinema. This reminds me of how Quentin Tarantino had a similar message in Inglorious Basterds. The style is not what we have come to expect from the master. First, the work is done in 3D and takes place in Paris. Secondly, the concept of the film is family oriented: he’s never done anything like it. The result is a spectacular experience, it is in itself, a dream come true. 

The characters in the film are colorful and the cast’s acting seems sincere, but the one that stands out is Sir Ben Kingsley known for his masterpiece ‘Ghandi’ from 1982. The youngsters Asa Butterfield (The Boy in the Striped Pajamas) and Chloe Moretz (Kick Ass) do a good job although it is obvious that the boy lacks acting chops. The cast includes Sacha Baron Cohen (Borat) who shows a dramatic side for the first time, Emily Mortimer and Richard Griffiths, Ray Winstone as Hugo’s drunken uncle, Jude Law as Hugo’s father, and Christopher Lee, as a librarian.  

The 3D experience is one of this year’s best. You only have to see the opening scene to understand how wonderfully Scorsese presented it.

‘Hugo’ is one of my favorite movies of the year because it is visually impressive, it uses 3D technology perfectly, the story is original and it connects me with my passion for movies, I like its adventurous plot and the characters are memorable. And of course, it is yet another chance to delight ourselves seeing a Scorsese film, one of the greatest directors in the history of cinema. What a luxury!  

Jack Rico

By

2011/07/12 at 12:00am

Rango

07.12.2011 | By |


Jack Rico

By

2011/03/05 at 12:00am

Rango

03.5.2011 | By |

Rango

Rango’ has got to be one of the most original, innovative and sophisticated animated comedies I have ever seen. With that said, it does possess some moments in the middle that drag. Though on the surface it might look like a film for kids, don’t kid yourself, it is mainly for adults. The dialogue is way too advanced for children to follow as well as the profound existential themes it kicks around from the very beginning. This spells ‘boring’ for kids who have expectations to laugh and have fun.

 

Gore Verbinski (The Pirates of the Caribbean series) directs and Johnny Depp lends his voice to this animated ‘Chinatown’ meets the Old West. The story follows Rango (Depp), a sheltered chameleon living as an ordinary family pet, while facing a major identity crisis. After all, how high can you aim when your whole purpose in life is to blend in? When Rango accidentally winds up in the gritty, gun-slinging town of Dirt — a lawless outpost populated by the desert’s most wily and whimsical creatures — the less-than-courageous lizard suddenly finds he stands out. Welcomed as the last hope the town has been waiting for, new Sheriff Rango is forced to play his new role to the hilt… until, in a blaze of action-packed situations and encounters with outrageous characters, Rango starts to become the hero he once only pretended to be.

The opening sequence is as memorable as anything you’re going to see this year. The pristine visual animation and Depp’s thespian abilities bring to life a mesmerizing set of sequences that establish the artistic and high concept tone for the rest of the movie.

Pixar has they’re job cut out for them. With animated films like ‘Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole,’ ‘The Illusionist,’ ‘How To Train Your Dragon,’ and now ‘Rango,’ we are starting to see that Pixar is no longer the only source of quality movies for families, children and adults. Rango is a work of art in many ways, not just a visual masterpiece. It’s script has a great message, the voice acting is captivating and the characters are interesting and amusing, such as the Mexican mariachi birds voiced by Latino George Del Hoyo, amongst others and Roadkill by Alfred Molina. There was defintely a Latino flavor in the film that was palpable, in particular, at the beginning.

Regarding the voice acting, the cast is one of the many stupendous aspects of ‘Rango’. It’s something to indulge in and enjoy. The cast consists of Isla Fisher, Abigail Breslin, Alfred Molina, Ray Winstone, Ned Beatty, and Bill Nighy.

If you are a parent and are wondering if ‘Rango’ has fun elements for your child, the answer is yes. There’s enough gags, action and fast paced scenes to entertain a child, just not enough to captivate them for the whole duration of the movie. Adults… looks like this one’s for you more than it is for them.

Select a Page