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I Love You Archives - ShowBizCafe.com

I Love You Archives - ShowBizCafe.com

Namreta Kumar

By

2009/10/13 at 12:00am

New York, I Love You

10.13.2009 | By |

Rated: R for language and sexual content.
Release Date: 2009-10-16
Starring: Emmanuel Benbihy, Tristan Carné
Director(s):
Distributor:
Film Genre:
Country: USA
Official Website: http://www.newyorkiloveyouthemovie.com/#/home

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New York, I Love You

With a film that has so many names attached to it there are so many places where it can succeed and just as many places where it can fail. New York, I Love You startles on this double-edged sword for so many reasons.

So the basics are that it is a composition of short stories that intertwine together to tell one larger narrative. And as the title suggests the shorts are about New York and about love. Each story focuses on two things: (1) it is inherently a New York moment, and (2) it is about love.

The beauty of this production is that it is designed as a taskmaster and it works that way, if you love New York you get to see the many ways it loves. The worst part of the production is that although the craftsmanship is great, the movie does not connect, which sadly was the principle idea. Independent of the lofty ideas and its predecessor, Paris Je T’Aime, this film just seems discontinuous, which may work for New York but not for the film. On the other hand all the powerful performances of the film should make you think twice before you pass it up. From veteran actor Andy Garcia’s impressive minutes on screen to Natalie Portman’s first steps as an intelligent director, the art of film lives in many degrees with its curators.

The concept and the gusto of the project are endearing, but they never quite hit the mark. The irony is that it truly embodies New York in many ways; when you jump into the film you jump into the rhythm of New York. The intent of the film was to carry forward with the principle ideas of movies like Crash, where everything is connected without straight lines, but what comes across are lines that cross over one another without a big picture.

Essentially this film is one that is worth a watch, but how and when you decide to watch it depends on which side of the sword you fall on. This is a film that tells you to decide for yourself, but because of its approach I think most people will enjoy it more at home with a group of their own loved ones and where they can critically evaluate where this film is leading.

Mack Chico

By

2009/07/08 at 12:00am

I Love You, Beth Cooper

07.8.2009 | By |

Rated: PG-13 for crude and sexual content, language, some teen drinking and drug references, and brief violence.
Release Date: 2009-07-10
Starring: Larry Doyle
Director(s):
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Film Genre:
Country: USA
Official Website: http://www.iloveyoubethcoopermovie.com/

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I Love You, Beth Cooper

I Love You, Beth Cooper is a film that blends the satirical and the serious, although the former lacks the edge to give it bite and the latter is only occasionally applied with conviction. The result feels at odds with itself and never fully satisfies. There’s a sense that a much better movie is trying to get out but it never attains escape velocity.

 

It’s graduation day for the seniors of Buffalo Grove High, and valedictorian Denis Cooverman (Paul Rust) is about to deliver an unusual address. In it, he professes unrequited love for the school’s head cheerleader, Beth Cooper (Hayden Panettiere). This delights Denis’ best friend, Rich (Jack T. Carpenter), who is the instigator of Denis’ confession. Beth is conflicted – despite being embarrassed, she finds the whole thing “so sweet.” Her thuggish, drugged-out boyfriend, Kevin (Shawn Roberts), decides that ending Denis’ life might be the best way to resolve an unpleasant situation. Events conspire to group Denis, Beth, Rich, and Beth’s two best friends, Cammy (Lauren London) and Treece (Lauren Storm), together for the night. Their misadventures include avoiding Kevin when he launches an attack on Denis’ house, breaking into the school for some fun in the showers, turning up at the most popular party of the evening, and spending time in a cabin in the woods. Out for blood, Kevin is always in hot pursuit, and both Beth and Denis discover things about their feelings for one another they weren’t expecting.

 

The intended raunchy content has been watered down for PG-13 consumption. There is nudity, but it’s of the peek-a-boo variety. Director Chris Columbus, a graduate of the John Hughes school of filmmaking (perhaps best known for handling the first two Harry Potter movies), avoids anything deeply scathing or controversial. Although I Love You, Beth Cooper doesn’t quite fit neatly into the teenage romantic comedy mold, it comes close, with titles like Risky Business and The Girl Next Door being appropriate antecedents. (The Tom Cruise movie is even mentioned explicitly.) 

 

Hayden Panettiere is best-known for her role in the TV series Heroes, although her acting career stretches back much farther. She shows impressive range here, essentially having to play three versions of Beth Cooper: the image that attracts the eyes and stirs the hormones of all the boys in school (including Denis); the scary, reckless one who pushes boundaries and buttons; and the “real” girl behind all the curtains. Panettiere integrates the three into one, which is a more adept task than one might imagine. The performance is better than the movie deserves.

 

There’s a sense that I Love You, Beth Cooper has been smoothed out and dumbed down to reach the broadest audience. (Not having read the novel by Larry Doyle, who also penned the screenplay, I can’t say for sure.) As good as some of the bonding material is, that’s how unfortunate many of the so-called comedic and generic story elements are. I Love You, Beth Cooper is schizophrenic – two very different movies uneasily occupying the same space and time. One of them has promise; the other is annoying and off-putting. The filmmakers lacked the courage and conviction to tell an honest, character-based story and resorted to something that has been massaged into a more comfortable, easily consumable cinematic morsel. Too bad the inevitable result of ingesting this is heartburn.

Jack Rico

By

2009/03/18 at 12:00am

I Love You, Man

03.18.2009 | By |

Rated: R for pervasive language, including crude and sexual references.
Release Date: 2009-03-20
Starring: John Hamburg and Larry Levin
Director(s):
Distributor:
Film Genre:
Country: USA
Official Website: http://iloveyouman.com/

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I Love You, Man

I Love You, Man,” is the movie that will catapult Paul Rudd from supporting actor to leading man status. He’s been a journey man throughout his whole career until his recent streak of small, yet successful substantial roles, has either salvaged movies (Forgetting Sarah Marshall) or surprised many with his comical talents (Role Models).

Peter Klaven (Paul Rudd) is a successful real estate agent who, upon getting engaged to the woman of his dreams, Zooey (Rashida Jones), discovers, to his dismay and chagrin, that he has no male friend close enough to serve as his Best Man. Peter immediately sets out to rectify the situation, embarking on a series of bizarre and awkward “man-dates,” before meeting Sydney Fife (Jason Segel), a charming, opinionated man with whom he instantly bonds with. But the closer the two men get, the more Peter’s relationship with Zooey suffers, ultimately forcing him to choose between his fiancee and his new found “bro,”.

Rudd is once again the embodiment of hilarity and charm. What’s interesting about him is his ability to take what sounds like a bad joke on paper and convert it into laugh-out-loud laughs. That is a gift and he oozes it. Segel is amusing too, but he’s much more affable than he is comical. I just don’t chortle when he jokes. The ensemble overall hid the few flaws the movie had with some genuinely hysterical moments (Jon Favreau and Rudd clashing it out in a drinking game).

In general, most people will who aren’t into the bathroom humor will like the nice balance of college, sexual jokes and endearing, knee-slapping punchlines. “I Love You, Man,” will be one of the top 5 comedies of 2009.

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