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The Wolfman

02.9.2010 | By |

The Wolfman

Unfortunately The Wolfman was exactly what I expected it to be, a movie where action prevails and the plot is predictable and hollow, it is basically secondary. I had a moment of hope during the climax of the movie that it was going to be better than I expected, I was wrong. I do give credit to the animation crew as well as those who worked on the settings because they are fantastic.

The main character, Lawrence Talbot (Benecio del Toro) belongs to a theater group in London; he’s a man who is lonely and hasn’t spoken to his family since he was a child. His father sent him to the U.S. to keep him away from his childhood traumas. He’s a man full of pain and suffering, he only returns
home because his brother’s fianceé Gwen Conliffe (Emily Blunt) writes to him about his brother’s disappearance and at his arrival asks him to solve the mystery of his murder. His father (Anthony Hopkins) greets him coldly but with loving words, he’s mysterious and he’s estranged from his family. He lives in a castle where we start to learn about Lawrence Talbot’s childhood and begin to see that although he had a privileged childhood he didn’t have it easy.


The movie develops at a nice rhythm, but since very early on we are able to make conclusions about how it will end. The Puerto Rican actor Benicio del Toro does the role of a man with a dark past and an even darker future perfectly; as a fan of the original movie and a collector of ‘wolfman’ paraphernalia, he studied his character well. I can’t imagine anyone else playing the main role, although there is not much to work from; Del Toro did a good job, especially in the scenes where his physical pain was very real. Hopkins was perfect for the role of the creepy and enigmatic father, it was almost like seeing Lecter with a ‘paternal’ side.


I knew the movie was a thriller but I didn’t know it was also supposed to be a horror flick; it does have moments that startle you but it is far more gory than scary. The cast did a good job and the panorama is beautiful, also the fact that it is placed in the times of Jack the Ripper makes it more attractive. It would have been a better movie if the plot were more engaging. It is definitely not for kids, although at some point it becomes a version of ‘The Beauty and the Beast’ but for adults.

Rated: Not available.
Release Date: 2010-02-12
Screenplay: Andrew Kevin Walker, David Self
Official Website:

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